Writing apache redirect rules of chess

Finally, the flags in square brackets, the same as with a RewriteRule.

Writing apache redirect rules of chess

This allows you to apply rules based on all sorts of request parameters, including browser identifiers, referring URL or a multitude of other strings. The string to test the second part of the condition can be a variety of different things. The default behaviour, if a rule is preceded by multiple conditions, is that it is only applied if all rules match. The pattern may not be interpreted as a pattern if it starts with specific characters as described in the following "exceptions" section. Instead of rewriting the URL internally, Apache will send a message back to the browser an HTTP header to tell it that the document has moved temporarily to the URL given in the "substitution" section. Once a substitution has occurred, the rules that follow are matched against the substituted value. They can be used to tell apache to treat the rule as case-insensitive, to stop processing rules if the current one matches, or a variety of other options.

Exceptions and Special Cases Rewrite conditions can be tested in a few different ways - they do not need to be treated as regular expression patterns, although this is the most common way they are used.

The Substitution can also contain back-references to parts of the incoming URL-path matched by the Pattern.

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For more on backreferences see below. The condition operates in a similar way to the rule.

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Captures in the RewriteRule patterns are counterintuitively available to all preceding RewriteCond directives, because the RewriteRule expression is evaluated before the individual conditions.

The Pattern is a regular expression. The arguments are Pattern: which incoming URLs should be affected by the rule; Substitution: where should the matching requests be sent; [flags]: options affecting the rewritten request. Rewrite conditions can, like rewrite rules, be followed by flags, and there are only two.

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The default behaviour, if a rule is preceded by multiple conditions, is that it is only applied if all rules match. This is one of the most common methods of rewriting URLs of items that have moved to a new URL for example, it is in use extensively on this site to forward users to new post URLs whenever they are changed.

Figure 2: Syntax of the RewriteRule directive. Figure 1 shows to which locations the back-references are transferred for expansion as well as illustrating the flow of the RewriteRule, RewriteCond matching.

Apache rewriterule flags

This can allow you to only apply certain rules to a subset of requests. Figure 2: Syntax of the RewriteRule directive. It is initially for the first rewrite rule or until a substitution occurs matched against the URL-path of the incoming request the part after the hostname but before any question mark indicating the beginning of a query string or, in per-directory context, against the request's path relative to the directory for which the rule is defined. Without the condition, this rule would create a loop, with every request matching that rule and being sent back to itself. The rule is intended to only redirect requests missing the "www" URL portion, though, and the condition preceding the rule ensures that this happens. Exceptions and Special Cases Rewrite conditions can be tested in a few different ways - they do not need to be treated as regular expression patterns, although this is the most common way they are used. A RewriteRule consists of three arguments separated by spaces. This is one of the most common methods of rewriting URLs of items that have moved to a new URL for example, it is in use extensively on this site to forward users to new post URLs whenever they are changed. For more on backreferences see below. The arguments are Pattern: which incoming URLs should be affected by the rule; Substitution: where should the matching requests be sent; [flags]: options affecting the rewritten request. This allows you to apply rules based on all sorts of request parameters, including browser identifiers, referring URL or a multitude of other strings. Either an absolute or a relative URL can be given in the substitution section. If you only want to apply a rule if one of two conditions match, rather than repeat the rule, add the "OR" flag to the first condition, and if either match then the following rule will be applied. In the next chapters, we will be exploring how to use these back-references, so do not fret if it seems a bit alien to you at first. They are comma-separated, and contained in square brackets.

Conditions Rewrite rules can be preceded by one or more rewrite conditions, and these can be strung together.

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